Health Care Careers

The range of interests and abilities needed in health care fields is too broad to permit a single characterization of the student sought by medical or dental colleges. In general, medical, dental and other health professional schools are interested in students who have demonstrated the ability to learn and think on a variety of subjects at the college level, and who are able to comprehend information and express ideas, in both spoken and written form, about the things they know.

Your Academic Profile

Consistently high performance in a rigorous and broad academic program throughout the college years is critical to be a viable candidate at the time of application to medical school. The average GPA of matriculating first year medical students nationally is 3.5 with an MCAT score of 30/45 (about 80%). Successful matriculating University of Connecticut students had average GPAs of 3.52 and MCAT scores of 30/45. Although attitudes about the importance of hospital or other medical experience vary greatly, there is a pronounced trend toward expecting such experience.

Your Motivation

Interest in medicine as a career should be personally motivated and not chosen merely to satisfy the expectations of other persons or in response to outside pressures. Many Institutions deem previous medical experience as desirable and see it as a way of demonstrating a caring attitude toward others, good interpersonal relationships, and sincere motivation for a career in medicine. Many institutions indicate that they are more interested in activities in which a candidate demonstrates a caring nature even if the involvement is not directly in a health-care related field.

Given the enormous emotional, intellectual and physical demands placed on physicians, students should be certain of their motivation for a career in medicine before applying to medical school. If you have any questions or doubts you should take the time to contact your personal physician about his or her experiences and motivations to be a physician.

The desire to be of service to humanity is expressed in teaching, research, or in some other related biomedical field, as well as in the medical treatment of ill patients. Doctors who are responsible for the delivery of medical treatment, as well as for other aspects of the health care delivery system in the United States, are a highly select group, whose desire to alleviate suffering and disease is only one of many motives and abilities that qualify them to enter into the medical training as the first step to becoming a physician.